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Do You Hold Company Administrative Assistant Meetings? We Need Your Input!

Does your company have regular Administrative Assistant Meetings? We are trying to initiate company meetings for Administrative Assistants to share information. We have been asked to document what other companies are doing and also show that it is a best practice, so any articles you have stating this would be wonderful. How are they structured? (Frequency, agenda items discussed, who manages the meetings and selects topics, etc.) What are the benefits to the Assistants and company. And if there aren't any benefits, please state that too. Your information is important and will be shared with management as they have asked us to benchmark against other companies as they consider our request. Please share your company name if you feel comfortable, and size of company. Thank you!!

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I'm retired now, but when I was working (as a Federal Government Employee and later as a support contractor) we planned to have regular monthly meetings (support from 1st line supervisors is key) for the Admin Staff to go over new clerical procedures, get their suggestions on ways to make the various admin processes work better, etc. It worked as long as our Chain of Command supported this meeting. We made this a working lunch, and kept the items for discussion to two or three, so we could be done in an hour. Honora Daly on 4/20/2017 3:18:05 PM
We have monthly EA/AA meetings. It is headed by the HR Department. Anyone can put input on agenda items. Consistent topics we have is a rotating schedule of a teaching moment - sharing any process, technology user tip, short cut, etc, that we use in our jobs. Upcoming Events of the company, and sharing of our Executives or departments schedule with upcoming events, meetings and if any could have schedule conflicts. Scentsy, Inc. with just over 1000 employees. Kerrin Daudt on 4/20/2017 2:09:35 PM
Our marketing company has 25 or so people and the whole team starting something this year called meeting rhythms. Simply put: each morning, teams meet with supervisors, and then the supervisors meet with the principals. Each of these meetings lasts only 15 min and you discuss priorities, roadblocks and values. That's it. I like it because you have a great idea of what is going on with other people on the team and solve problems quickly without having to go through email. Allison Jarrett on 4/20/2017 1:21:28 PM
The administrative team of 3 meets weekly on Monday mornings to go over scheduled events for the week, discuss any potential issues, and calendars for the week. We also do planning for upcoming luncheons and vacation scheduling. This team supports 1 EVP, 1 VP, 4 Directors, and approximately 75 staffers, so the weekly meetings have proven invaluable to make sure the bases are covered with each changing week. Rhonda Daugherty on 4/19/2017 9:27:52 AM
Yes, we have Administrative Assistant bi-monthly meetings. This time is used to network and to learn more about the inner workings and changes within the company. The admins are the eyes and ears for their execs. It's important for them to know where to go for what. When there are changes in procedures, we start with the admins before rolling them out to the departments and divisions. The same with software upgrades. Our bi-monthly meetings include software training, leadership training, and company-wide organizational changes. We are a company of about 200 employees with 12 admins. Attendance and participation at the meetings is part of every admins' job description. The execs are fully supportive of the group. Anonymous on 4/18/2017 2:17:46 PM
Yes, we do hold meetings for our administrative personnel. I work at a company that has both union and non-union employees. Given that, we have to work on making sure that we are a cohesive group as much as possible. We hold monthly meetings. We have eight total in our company. We meet for a half hour (we may be extending this to a full hour). The agenda is limited to one or two items. Everyone can submit ideas for the agenda. I work for the Executive Director, so I am the organizer and the facilitator for each meeting. It has really improved our group in terms of being connected to one another and learning from each other. We have also been able to take care of an issue which affected all of us by working as a group and presenting a solution. We also are able to share in our training opportunities. We keep the agenda small in order for us to be able to converse more. And we haven't run out of agenda items yet--in fact we always seem to get more and more ideas the more we meet. Have a great day. Joan Narodowiec on 4/18/2017 1:33:44 PM
When I joined this 10,000-employee international company eight years ago, the administrative staff was not connected as a business unit at all. Over the course of my first few years, I made different attempts at fostering admin staff coordination. My C-level supervisor was wholly supportive, but only a few admins "bit the bait", and participated regularly in conference calls and coordination efforts, such as a team SharePoint site. Honestly, a cohesive admin culture is just not valued or promoted here, and that's a shame. Many of the admin staff here have a clock-in-do-the-minimum-clock-out mentality and approach to their jobs. Very few are career-minded, and not many of them care enough to build a resource-sharing team. Most spend their days ticking tasks off of a list, while a few of us are strategists who envision the big picture. So many thoughts swim around my head about why this dynamic exists here. Is this mentality commensurate with what the company is willing to pay people for this role? (pay little-get little) Does the C-suite of executives care at all about how their admins operate as a team? Fortunately, my boss and I get along very well, and a handful of admins work hard to keep things rolling for the "top brass". He recognizes my style and approach to my career, so that keeps me motivated. Unless a higher authority empowers a leader among our admins, and holds the admin team accountable for cooperative activities and efforts, it will not happen. Admins often have all of the responsibility with none of the authority, and without top executive sponsorship, a cooperative admin corps has little chance of happening. Senior EA-Business Writer on 4/18/2017 1:19:15 PM
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