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Correspondence Routing Slip for Director's Signature

Hello, As I previously mentioned, I was recently relocated to another office within my department. I am looking for sample routing slips for correspondence that requires the director's signature within the office. Right now, everyone places correspondence in her inbox without any instructions or directions and expect her to sign off on them. If you wish to pass along a sample of your routing slip, please e-mail it to me at: irene.scott@dbhds.virginia.gov. Thank you for your assistance!

Submitted by: Irene Scott

 

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Hi again, I read the second response about tracking and I do like this idea. When the routing sheet practice is adhered to in our office, the routing sheet is filed with the final paperwork (travel documents, purchasing request documents, training request paperwork, etc) in the business office, away from where my boss and I are (executive offices). If I were to scan and electronically file, I would have a good respository to work with in case anything needed to be proven or traced back. Thanks. Joyce McSweeney on 7/29/2011 11:48:55 AM
Greetings, Our office does use a routing sheet. It is a new idea brought forth by our current leader. We did not use one before and there is a great deal of resistance. I will send you a copy. Basically, my boss wishes to have folks indicate what the form is that he is signing; who has seen it before, and has signed offf on it; if it is travel, training, or a purchase he wishes to have an impact statement relating to: what would be the impact if the person did not make the trip (eg.attend the conference, get the training) or make the purchase?; are there cheaper alternatives?, etc. On training he asked one staff member to provide what certificates he already held, to assess need. After I developed the sheet and explained it, folks oted to by-pass the process. I am now asked to write a policy on it and put the procedures in writing. We are an IT organization and the culture does not lend itself to this. I like the solution provided by the person who first replied. I look forward to reading other ideas. Joyce McSweeney on 7/29/2011 10:25:23 AM
Routing slips are okay, but they're not easily trackable. I dispensed with routing slips and just keep a red plastic signature folder on my desk for my supervisor. It's on his desk every morning, and he hands it back to me when he's ready, with all of the signed documents inside. From there, I scan and save the documents, and notify the originator by e-mail that it's ready for them to claim in my office. This way, I have two traceable trails that prove the document has been signed, and document originators own the responsibility for their documents. Senior EA-Business Writer on 7/29/2011 10:18:32 AM
Hi Irene! My boss has an in-box mounted on the wall outside his office door with a red plastic folder inside of it. This is where everyone is to place items for his signature. He will not sign anything unless there is a note or memo attached with a BRIEF explanation of what it is he is to sign and why and where to route it once he's signed it. He takes the folder out every couple of days (the goal was every day, but that doesn't seem to happen), signs everything then brings the folder to me to distribute back to everyone. If something needs immediate signature and cannot sit in the folder for a couple of days, they bring it to me. Not a routing slip, by any means, but this is what works best for him. Anonymous on 7/29/2011 9:43:22 AM
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